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You're a dev, so low-code platforms are useless. Wrong! Read on to find out why.

Everyone seems to be talking about low-code nowadays. Low-code app development platforms are already taking the IT world by storm. Moreover, the idea of being able to swiftly develop applications with minimal coding is appealing in itself. It has been aiding app modernization in all business verticals. But, with popularity, comes various perceptions and misconceptions. It is necessary to separate facts from myths in order to know the true capabilities of low-code app development platforms.

In forums and other channels, a lot of questions come in to get a better idea of what low-code is all about. Here is a list of popular low-code myths and some arguments to debunk them:

Now that the truth about these myths is finally out, businesses can leverage low-code app development platforms to develop future-proof applications and scale. But, while looking for a suitable low-code platform, make sure you avoid some major pitfalls that can prove to be disastrous for your business.

Originally published by Spruha Pandya in Dzone

This article provides the much needed checklist for CIOs, to assess the digital-readiness of their enterprises.

The goal of nearly every enterprise – regardless of industry focus or vertical – is to position its products and services to reach the masses as quickly and efficiently as possible. But to do so in today’s modern business environment, an enterprise must operate as a digital business.

Embodying a modern digital business requires that CIOs make a conscious and strategic effort to ensure they’re providing the newest experiences, offerings, and business models that users are looking for – or risk losing out to the competition. At its core, this objective hinges on enterprise CIOs’ ability to maintain IT infrastructure that can nimbly evolve and scale with the ever-changing digital environment.

Here is a checklist of the top features that define modern digital-ready enterprises to help CIOs quickly assess whether they’re meeting the mark – and form a tangible plan for modernisation if not.

Take a look at team structure

When assessing digital readiness, the first factor a CIO must evaluate is IT team structure. Are various IT environments unified, or do different subgroups have their own processes, technologies, and objectives? If the latter, CIOs will face a larger challenge managing resources, skills, and objectives across the enterprise – which is a threat to innovation, agility, and scalability. IT teams with distinct and isolated islands of technical knowledge will not be able to quickly execute on the projects needed to achieve modern digital-readiness.

Assess the client experience

The client experience is critical to the success of a modern enterprise, and customer demands are more fast-moving than ever before due to factors like mobile technology, automation, and machine learning. As a result, an enterprise’s customer and user experiences must be visually appealing as well as fully responsive so individuals can make contact with the firm quickly and intuitively from any channel, device, or location. Rapid access to this feedback and engagement is a key part of refining technical and operational business processes from the CIO perspective – so it’s important that the digital customer journey includes well-defined touchpoints across multiple channels to facilitate client responsiveness.

Consider cloud capabilities

Being a modern digital enterprise requires having a software infrastructure that is capable of scaling with growing business demands. In many cases, achieving the level of speed and agility needed to remain competitive can be addressed through the adoption of cloud-native software, which is designed to harness the efficiency of cloud computing delivery models. CIOs that have not yet implemented cloud-native technology are forfeiting numerous benefits, including flexible application development, faster-acting IT systems, and reduced operating costs.

Capitalise on continuous delivery models

Cloud functionality and continuous delivery capabilities go hand in hand. Implementing continuous delivery models allows CIOs to create a strong feedback loop between the business and its customers by enabling software updates to be built, tested, and released rapidly at the touch of a button without affecting usage. Enterprises that employ a continuous delivery model to optimise their IT investments will have an edge on overall organizational performance as compared to the ones that that are not able to deliver their value as quickly and reliably to end-users.

Evaluate service ecosystem connectivity

Maintaining a digital-ready IT infrastructure also requires assessing the connectivity of systems used with the enterprise. The typical business leverages a wide range of systems – including internal enterprise systems, external tools the firm has adopted (like a CRM), and hybrid applications that the enterprise is developing. Do these three buckets of systems interact to share data in an integrated manner? A lack of streamlined connectivity can paralyse an enterprise’s ability to respond to changing user demands from an IT infrastructure perspective.

Create a gap-closing game plan

Attaining the above checklist items is all part of maturing as a digital enterprise and investing in the long-term viability of IT infrastructure. However, a final component of a holistic digital-readiness checklist is assessing whether CIOs have a plan in place for closing any gaps in modernized capabilities. If an enterprise isn’t quite hitting the mark, there are many system integrators, low-code platforms, and industry specialists firms can tap into to maintain a modern IT environment capable of agile growth and scale without disrupting the productivity.

Originally published by Vijay Pullur, CEO WaveMaker, in Enterprise-CIO.com

Low-code platforms have made it possible to build applications by visually orchestrating the required building blocks without the need for reinventing the wheel for every project. Enterprises expect low-code platforms to standardize those building blocks so that it can be used across the enterprise by different teams and different projects. This is essentially a shot in the arm for the developers by significantly accelerating their productivity through the reusability of their code. WaveMaker has found a way to do exactly this, by creating an Enterprise Artifact Repository as part of its Enterprise Developer Network (EDN) setup. EDN is an online environment that allows collaboration over projects, version control, and sharing of resources.

WaveMaker’s artifact repository is essentially a resource repository that standardizes on a collection of prefabs, project shells, templates, and themes. It lets the enterprise developers create, test, and publish useful app components to the repository for enterprise-wide access by other development and business teams alike. It also allows for easy exploration and discovery of resources to be made available to the developers. The EAR provides a range of artifacts starting from simple templates, themes, feature- specific prefabs to even project shells.

Reusable Artifacts in WaveMaker

Artifact Features

All artifacts have a standard set of information either auto-generated or provided by the developer like tag, category, version no, and changelog.

Creating and Publishing Artifacts

Artifacts are created by developers using the project dashboard by invoking the create function of the respective artifact. The artifacts developed are published either:

Artifact developers create the artifacts which are pushed to the EDN- pending approval of the EDN Admin. Each of the artifacts will go through the four stages: In Development, Unpublished, Rejected, and Approved which are self-explanatory.

The standard process remaining the same, each of the artifacts has a slightly different publishing flow as described here: Prefab, Project Shell, Template Bundle, and Themes. Once published, the artifacts can be viewed from the Artifacts Dialog and are available for use for the entire enterprise. The admins can manage the artifacts through the EDN dashboard itself. WaveMaker also allows EDN admins to import and export the enterprise artifacts using zip files.

Introducing WaveMaker 10

Enterprise Developer Network/Artifact Repository is a new feature in WaveMaker 10. Learn more.