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Enterprise Application Development

Share with Care: Collaborate securely with RBAC

Today, enterprises rely on a global team of developers with varied roles & skills to develop applications. When many developers collaborate on large projects, clear access control policies are required for effective collaboration. But traditional development tools have failed to address the need for developer roles and access control. As organizations feel the pressure to create applications faster and more frequently, the lack of governance can result in coding defects, deployment issues, and delayed projects.

WaveMaker provides comprehensive role-based access control (RBAC) features for enterprise application development teams. The RBAC features center on the principle of minimal privilege i.e. to provide the least level of access to perform tasks to the full extent.

Permissions

Permissions manage access control for the various roles in the development process. WaveMaker provides a predefined list of permissions at three levels – platform, project, and resources. Refer to the developer RBAC documentation for more on permissions and access control.

Roles

Roles represent a set of permissions that can be assigned to a user. WaveMaker offers different roles for platform and project administration.

Platform administration through product roles
Product roles are for platform administration and are generally assigned to IT users. Product roles offer three predefined access control levels – Super Admin, Enterprise Admin, and Studio User.  You cannot create new product roles. In this way, the platform demarcates itself into compartments accessible only to the authorized users.

Define custom roles for projects
Project roles are for developers and project leaders involved in application development. These roles combine flexibility and control by offering predefined and custom roles. Besides the predefined roles of Project Admin and Default, admins can create new project roles. Most enterprises have several projects with shared project resources. So, the same user can assume different roles in different projects.

Configure and assign roles

Admins can assign product roles to users in the onboarding section of Launchpad, the administrator portal. They can also create custom project roles such as UI Developer or DevOps by configuring appropriate permissions.

Project administrators can then invite users to projects and assign one of the configured project roles. Roles can also be updated via a project’s User Management settings.

With WaveMaker role-based access control, developers can collaborate better and create applications faster without the risk of project governance issues. Refer to the project user management documentation for more details.

Introducing WaveMaker 10
Role-based access control at the platform and project level is a new feature in WaveMaker 10. Learn more

Categories
Insights

Software modernization myths likely holding you back

Highlighting four prevalent myths holding developers, and IT leaders back from successful legacy application modernization projects.

As new cloud, AI, and mobile technologies continue to shape the tech landscape, it’s increasingly challenging for developers and IT leaders to maintain up-to-date applications in the face of nonstop innovation. It’s no wonder that many industry professionals are concerned about their ability to effectively and affordably complete an application modernization project, citing obstacles such as a lack of funding, skill, or experience to pull the process off.

However, many of these fears are commonly believed myths that can be overcome with the right approach and a strategic use of third-party resources. In this day and age, tackling legacy application modernization does not have to be costly, complex, or disruptive.

Myth 1: “Refreshing UI counts as modernization”

Revamping an application’s UI is simply not enough to cross modernization off an enterprise’s to-do list. When it comes to anything but the most basic legacy applications, a fresh look is just a starting point. Most enterprise applications are extensive and have complex workflows, meaning that a UI facelift will not necessarily improve the end-user’s experience or address a company’s larger business goals. Projects must target the deeper tech layer of an application in order to result in meaningful modernization.

Myth 2: “Modernizing our application will be too disruptive to our business”

Minimally invasive modernization projects are within reach with the availability of new technologies and Rapid Application Development platforms. For example, wrapping is a process in which developers can apply a layer of API to a legacy system in order to refresh an application’s capabilities without touching the original architecture. Developers can also connect an API directly to the back-end of a legacy application, individually wrapping each system and eliminating the need to integrate local service data. Not all modernization scenarios require a painful platform switch – instead, APIs can be used to integrate new, fresh functionalities into the existing legacy system.

Myth 3: “Our IT team doesn’t have the resources for modernization”

In-depth technical knowledge is not a prerequisite for application modernization – there are many low-code platforms and services that offer templates, widgets, and other “drag and drop” features that can streamline IT teams’ time and resources. In addition to giving developers the tools to quickly and intuitively build and deploy new functionalities, Rapid Application Development platforms simplify the modernization process through automation. Features like automatic data integration, security checks, and cross-platform support can reduce the time developers must spend fixing basic, error-prone, and technical aspects of a project, freeing up their resources to focus on bigger picture business and functionality goals.

Myth 4: “We can’t afford a modernization project right now”

Taking the time to identify the top priorities for a modernization project in advance can keep processes affordable and financially strategic. IT leaders must closely examine their own business objectives as well as their existing application architecture in order to choose a focused path toward modernization that will be impactful, yet versatile enough to be a future-proof investment. For example, many enterprises may find integrating open source software during a modernization project to be a productive investment that pays off in terms of cost efficiency and the long-term flexibility of avoiding vendor lock-in when future updates need to be made.

Moreover, in today’s ever-changing digital environment, enterprises cannot afford to let their applications stagnate – especially considering the fact that 90 percent of consumers would consider taking their business elsewhere rather than work with a company that uses outdated technology. Understanding the common myths surrounding modernization projects will help developers and IT leaders shake off their concerns and identify the resources they need to update legacy applications while balancing risk, cost, flexibility, and speed.

Originally published by Vijay Pullur, CEO WaveMaker, in App Developer Magazine